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Rice fields on the Vietnam-China border shimmering yellow in autumn weather

Rice fields on the Vietnam-China border

In September and October, paddy fields in Cao Bang Province on the border with China turn golden yellow, heralding the rice harvest season.

Rice fields on the Vietnam-China border

Home to a UNESCO-recognized geopark and Southeast Asia’s largest waterfall, Cao Bang, around 280 kilometers from Hanoi, is less busy than neighboring Sa Pa or Ha Giang. In mid-September and early October it is the rice harvest season there, giving tourists a glimpse of local people’s daily lives.

Rice fields on the Vietnam-China border

Lensman Dang Van Hai visited Cao Bang last month for a photo series. He says visitors should wake up at 4 a.m. to see ethnic minority people go to their fields to harvest rice. Due to its proximity to the border, the use of flycam is restricted, he says.

Rice fields on the Vietnam-China border

At the start of October rice fields along the Quay Son River in Trung Khanh District, which forms a natural border with China, are golden ripe. The river originates in China’s Jingxi County in the Chongshan Mountain Range and runs along the border.

Rice fields on the Vietnam-China border

Golden rice paddies in Ngoc Con, a mountainous commune in Trung Khanh District near the Po Peo border gate, is shrouded in mist. As tourism grows, locals, mainly ethnic minority families, offer homestay for visitors at VND100,000-200,000 ($4.19-8.38) a night.

Rice fields on the Vietnam-China border

People harvest rice in a field in Phong Nam Commune in Trung Khanh District. The commune is mainly inhabited by the ethnic Tay who earn their livelihood from farming and fishing and live in traditional stilt houses made of stone.

Rice fields on the Vietnam-China border

People carry paddy home over a wooden bridge.

Rice fields on the Vietnam-China border

There are 20-30 Tay families living along paddy fields in Phong Nam Commune. In addition to growing rice, they also fish in the Quay Son River to earn a living.

Rice fields on the Vietnam-China border

Rice paddies near the Ban Gioc Waterfall have not yet turned golden unlike at other places. Ban Gioc, which marks the border, is the largest waterfall in Southeast Asia and the world’s fourth largest along a national border after Iguazu, Victoria and Niagara. It is 53 meters high and 300 meters wide. There is a small sloping path leading to the waterfall. Small buses can traverse the path while bigger ones drop off their passengers at a parking lot at the Vietnam border station from where they have to walk.

Rice fields on the Vietnam-China border

Horses are available for rent in Ban Gioc at VND20,000 per person.

Source: vnexpress.net

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